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Friday, October 9, 2009

D'Novo All-American Quarterfinals Feature Both New and Familiar Faces


©Colette Lewis 2009--
Tulsa OK--

Two seeds, a qualifier, a wild card and four others survived a challenging day at the D'Novo ITA All-American to reach Saturday's quarterfinals.

Wet courts and temperatures in the upper 40s are not the best way to start the second day of a major collegiate tournament, but with the help of the six indoor courts at the Michael D. Case Tennis Center, one round of doubles and two rounds of singles were completed, all before 8 p.m. Friday evening.

Qualifier Eric Quigley, who had upset top seed Oleksandr Nedovyesov of Oklahoma State Thursday, kept it going on Friday, winning five straight games in the second set to take a 6-2, 7-5 decision from Baylor's Jordan Rux in his first match, then rolling past No. 9 seed Sanam Singh of Virginia 6-1, 6-3 in the third round evening match. His opponent in the quarterfinals is unseeded Andrei Daescu of Oklahoma, who beat Georgia's Jamie Hunt and Texas Tech's Raony Carvalho to earn his spot.

Alex Lacroix of Florida faces Steve Johnson of Southern California in the other quarterfinal in the top half. Lacroix downed Drew Courtney of Virginia and Brennan Boyajian of North Carolina, while Johnson took out Moritz Baumann of Wisconsin and longtime nemesis Bradley Klahn of Stanford, the No. 14 seed. Last year the two freshman had met three times, with Klahn winning on each occasion, so Johnson came into Friday's match determined to break through against his former junior rival.

"We have just battled," said Johnson, who sported a USC stocking cap when he wasn't playing. "Going back to the juniors I'd lost to him 6-7, 7-6, 7-6 or whatever. And then last year we had a battle at Stanford, 6 and 4, at Ojai (the Pac-10 individual title) 6 and 4, and then the NCAAs was 6 in the third. It was time. I guess I was due for one."

It looked as if he might fall short once again. After winning the first set 6-4, Johnson lost the second 7-5, and was broken serving at 3-4 in the third. But Klahn couldn't serve it out, Johnson held at love to make it 5-5, then got another break to serve for the match.

"I was fortunate enough to make a couple of first serves in that last game, get a couple of easy points, which really helps when you're serving for it," said Johnson, who looked more relieved than elated when he had won the final point of the 6-4, 5-7, 7-5 victory.

Johnson's teammate Robert Farah, the NCAA Team MVP when Southern California won the title back in May, also reached the quarterfinals, coming from a set down in his second round win over Marek Michalicka of Wisconsin. The No. 3 seed outlasted qualifier Ionut Beleleu of Oklahoma 7-6(3), 6-4 in the third round, leaving the Trojans as the only team with two players in the quarterfinals.

Farah will play unseeded Jason Jung of Michigan, who breezed past No. 10 seed Saketh Myneni of Alabama in the second round, then came from a break down in the final set to get by qualifier Neal Skupski of LSU 6-3, 4-6, 6-4.

Second seed JP Smith of Tennessee earned a quarterfinal spot with two straight set victories. The 2008 NCAA finalist defeated UCLA's Kalim Stewart in the second round and No. 13 seed Michael Shabaz of Virginia in the third round. Smith's 6-3, 6-4 win over Shabaz was the only round of 16 match that featured two seeded players.

Smith's opponent Saturday is wild card Ashley Watling of Tulsa, who derailed Duke freshman Henrique Cunha in the second round and stormed past Boise State's James Meredith in the third round 6-2, 6-1.

The doubles are also at the quarterfinals stage, and with today's loss by top seeds Jamie Hunt and Nate Schnugg to Aleksey Bessonov and Nedovyesov of Oklahoma State, and yesterday's loss by No. 2 seeds Farah and Johnson, No. 3 seeds Moritz Baumann and Michalicka of Wisconsin are the highest remaining seeds.

For complete draws, including consolation, see the ITA tournament page.

At the women's All-American at Riviera, three of the four semifinalists are set. No. 2 seed Chelsey Gullickson of Georgia play No. 4 seed Lena Jurikova of Cal, and Georgia Tech's Irina Falconi, the No. 8 seed, will play the winner of the Marina Cossou - Venise Chan quarterfinal.

For complete results, see the ITA tournament page.

13 comments:

Austin said...

Ive been forcing myself not to say this, but I cant hold it back any longer. Ryan Harrison is doing things no one has done at 17 since Andy Roddick. The only thing he hasnt done is perform at the junior grand slams, but his run in Challengers has been too impressive to ignore.

I have been calling this Eric Quigley coming out party for a year now, last season I said he was one of the best freshman in the country, now hes showing hes one of the best sophomores.

Man in the Moon said...

Austin
Ryan is doing terrific, there is no question about it.

He is making consistent progress in a healthy and good way.

Where you miss it every single time (emphasis added) -- is when you make comparisons - implying that he is on the same path as Roddick.

This really is unfair to Harrison and more importantly that is not how it works.

There isn't a set formula and past history of someone else is not a guarantee of how someone else will perform -- but you continue to make comments that suggest he is the next one.

It will come soon enough -- if he is the one --

I will not go back and name the names (too many to name) -- you have hitched the American Star to their name - but most of your picks have fallen way, way short.

Can't you just wait and when he really deserves the kudos -then shower him or anyone else -- after they arrive -- and not before --

You have been and are one of the many Americans that give much too much credit before they achieve.

I recall one time you raved about a 5 year old. Give me a break!!

He still has mountains to climb - even compared to the players a few years older - who have already achieved at his age or a bit older.

- look at the players who are a few years older - some of them only 1-2 years the rest 2-4 years older compare , Nadal, DelPotro, Muarry, Tsonga, Nole, Cilic, Monfils, etc.

justthefacts said...

To Austin

The reason Harrison probably did not do as well at the jr slams was he was playing them at 15 or 16, while Chase, who got to finals at the Open, turned 18 several months ago. Harrison is still young enough to play the jr. slams again next year and if he played any this year he probably would have won or got to the finals of any of them. Of the US kids Harrison has seems to have the best understanding of the court and his father has done an outstanding coaching job. Its good though he has developed without the hype surrounding Donald Young. Pat has the track record of developing juniors and has my vote to be head of USTA high performance. I am surprised noone has thought of that.

David said...

Man in the Moon, a few things:

1. Please stop putting words in people's mouths. Nobody is crowning Ryan Harrison.

2.Please stop complaining about people talking about promising junior tennis players on a junior tennis blog. Seriously, why even read this blog given your attitude? If you're only interested in established stars, stick to ATP message boards.

3. The incessant "I told you so's" are obnoxious when you consistently choose the safe "wait and see" approach. You can't be wrong when you don't make a prediction. I'll give you some measure of credit for Donald Young, who you did make a prediction on, but as I recall you didn't expect him to be nearly as good as he has been, which makes you as wrong as those who expected him to be a top player. I'd tone down the gloating.

4. You might want to check your math on those age comparisons. Tsonga is 7 years older, Nadal and Monfils 6 years older, Djokovic and Murray 5 years older, and Del Potro and Cilic 4 years older.

USA said...

That comment by man in the moon with the age comparism was by far the most inaccurate statement ever made. Talk about someone with just a straight resentment for american tennis to throw out false statement going against our players.

You should be ashamed to be an american.

The Dude said...

I think Man on the Moon is talking about the ages those players were when they made an impact, not their age difference now.

Man in the Moon said...

David & USA,

just to clear the air on a few points:

(1) Austin has been crowning anyone and everyone who wins a few matches (in the top level juniors or some future / challenger matches) as the next "great American Hope" and has been for years.

(2) and I quote my previous post " Ryan is doing terrific, there is no question about it. He is making consistent progress in a healthy and good way. " (Notice no comparison to Roddick or anyone else.

(3) the reason I haven't posted about the "next coming" IN THE PAST 5 YEARS --- is because I haven't seen a player yet that is worthy of being the " Next Great American" . And without being "obnoxious" THAT HAPPENS TO BE THE CASE.

(4) I said on many different occasions - that DY received way to much credit for where he would end up -- the way many, many people were talking about him-- saying certainly top 20 probably top 5 or ten. I never saw him better than top 50-75. So you can think whatever you want.

(5) the Math -- I guess I have to spell out each and every word - ( I thought you guys could read between the lines, but clearly you can't, so that is my fault)-- when those players were at 18, 19,20, 21 they had achieved greatness. If you also read what I said -- the results of one player achieving at a certain age does not guarantee that someone else will also-- so comparing which Austin does every single time -- is not an indicator.
Frankly, I should not have made the comparisons, either.

(6)USA - you have some nerve and a great deal of unmitigated gall -- with your comment and I quote " You should be ashamed to be an american." First and foremost - I don't resent American players -

YOU and your buddies (starting with Austin) are crippling, disabling, the Americans by your inflated worth of these Americans -- not that any SMART junior would buy into your entitlement theory of crowning them King when they haven't made the journey to that exalted position as of yet.

and that Mr. USA is what is the problem with American Tennis and I might add, a more than fair percentage of American's think that way-- the word entitlement -- which has caused a great problem of late in America concerning our position not only in Tennis but industry, banking, real estate, education, politicians - do I need to go on, Mr. USA --

Because I "call them the way I see them" and the fact that I don't believe in entitlement and crowning a King before it is time-- has no bearing on being a true American .

The facts are American tennis has not produced since Roddick and a few others -- and that is a fact.

If you can't take the heat on that stay out of the kitchen -- and it has nothing to do with being an American. (just because your handle is USA - doesn't mean you are the only one who is an American)

You should be ashamed of yourself -- notice I do not say one word about you being an American --

Man in the Moon said...

David & USA,

just to clear the air on a few points:

(1) Austin has been crowning anyone and everyone who wins a few matches (in the top level juniors or some future / challenger matches) as the next "great American Hope" and has been for years.

(2) and I quote my previous post " Ryan is doing terrific, there is no question about it. He is making consistent progress in a healthy and good way. " (Notice no comparison to Roddick or anyone else.

(3) the reason I haven't posted about the "next coming" IN THE PAST 5 YEARS --- is because I haven't seen a player yet that is worthy of being the " Next Great American" . And without being "obnoxious" THAT HAPPENS TO BE THE CASE.

(4) I said on many different occasions - that DY received way to much credit for where he would end up -- the way many, many people were talking about him-- saying certainly top 20 probably top 5 or ten. I never saw him better than top 50-75. So you can think whatever you want.

(5) the Math -- I guess I have to spell out each and every word - ( I thought you guys could read between the lines, but clearly you can't, so that is my fault)-- when those players were at 18, 19,20, 21 they had achieved greatness. If you also read what I said -- the results of one player achieving at a certain age does not guarantee that someone else will also-- so comparing which Austin does every single time -- is not an indicator.
Frankly, I should not have made the comparisons, either.

(6)USA - you have some nerve and a great deal of unmitigated gall -- with your comment and I quote " You should be ashamed to be an american." First and foremost - I don't resent American players -

YOU and your buddies (starting with Austin) are crippling, disabling, the Americans by your inflated worth of these Americans -- not that any SMART junior would buy into your entitlement theory of crowning them King when they haven't made the journey to that exalted position as of yet.

and that Mr. USA is what is the problem with American Tennis and I might add, a more than fair percentage of America -- the word entitlement -- which has caused a great problem in America concerning our position not only in Tennis but industry, banking, real estate, education, politicians - do I need to go on, Mr. USA --

Because I "call them the way I see them" and the fact that I don't believe in entitlement and crowning a King before it is time-- has no bearing on being a true American .

The facts are American tennis has not produced since Roddick and a few others -- and that is a fact.

If you can't take the heat on that stay out of the kitchen -- and it has nothing to do with being an American. (just because your handle is USA - doesn't mean you are the only one who is an American)

You should be ashamed of yourself -- notice I do not say one word about being an American -- or not

USA said...

Man in the moon,

If you never have the guts to put your knowledge at a test, why dont you name someone you think has the tools. As far as I can see, we have an all around player, with great feel around the net, very steady groundstrokes and a great understanding of the game. NOt to mention a serve that was clocked at 136 mph at us open. To someone like me, its comical to read your comments. Because I know that your opinion will never have any impact other than on zootennis.com... you will never have the respect from anyone to make any comment that will have any affect on anything. So people like myself, who have seen the game, just laugh at the fact that the highlight of your day is hoping to get a reaction from someone on a blogger website.

abc said...

I'm sorry, but the whole Donald Young has gotten old. Need we butcher the poor boy anymore?

And as for Ryan Harrison, I'm looking forward to see what's in his future. Coming back from an injury is one thing...but to come back to the extent that Harrison has showed, a semifinal, final, and a win within a short span of time, I think is a great sign. I think this boy can do some real damage, just hope that no more serious injuries occur (if any).

And you have to admit, this is a step up for American juniors, especially after Oudin's run at the open. Within this week, we (the USA) got 2 winners, 1 finalist, and 2 semifinalist on the pro tour. Three of those results were 92s (Harrison, Capra, McHale), Riske and Brengle being the 90s. But still, overall, a very nice week for the US, especially juniors.

Man in the Moon said...

USA

take a deep breath, you are out of control and don't take yourself so seriously. Even as you say and I quote " you have seen the game"

How is that for coaching!!!

Man in the Moon said...

USA

to answer your point about who is out there.

I don't see any current junior or for that matter any American player under the age of 20 who has any chance of being top 10.

I also don't see us getting out of the bigger problems that America has -- real estate, banking, industry for the next 5 years.

Does that make me not an American, also. (re-read my 10-11-2009 post for some clarity)

Man in the Moon said...

my comments only pertain to the men's game -- not the women

I really don't follow the girls-junior, collegiate or pro--

I will say Oudin has done extremely well -- she is a fighter